The rules for posting are simple!

1. Every Friday post a photo that includes one or more flowers.
2. Please only post photos you have authority to use.
3. Include a link to this blog in your post - http://floralfridayfoto.blogspot.com/
4. Leave the link to your FloralFridayFoto post below on inlinkz.
5. Visit other blogs listed ... comment & enjoy!

When to Post:
inlinkz will be available every Thursday and will remain open until the next Wednesday.

Thursday, 9 July 2020

FFF449 - GINGER LILIES

Hedychium gardnerianum (Kahili ginger, Kahila garland-lily, or ginger lily) is a plant native to the Himalayas in India, Nepal, and Bhutan and is in the Zingiberaceae family. It grows to 2.4 m tall with long, bright green leaves clasping the tall stems.

The very fragrant pale yellow and red flowers are held in dense spikes above the foliage. They appear towards the end of summer. Ginger lilies have flourished in the wild in Australia and are now considered an invasive weed here and in NZ. Ginger lilies generally have yellow flowers but can also be hybrids with cream, orange, red and white flowers.

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Thursday, 2 July 2020

FFF448 - BLUE LOTUS

Nymphaea caerulea, known primarily as blue lotus (or blue Egyptian lotus), but also blue water lily (or blue Egyptian water lily), and sacred blue lily (or sacred narcotic lily of the Nile), is a water-lily in the genus NymphaeaIts original habitat may have been along the Nile and other parts of East Africa. It spread more widely in ancient times, including to the Indian subcontinent and Thailand.

Some evidence indicates the medicinal effects of plants including N. caerulea that contain the psychoactive alkaloid aporphine were known to both the Maya and the Ancient Egyptians. The mildly sedating effects of N. caerulea makes it a likely candidate (among several) for the lotus plant eaten by the mythical Lotophagi in Homer's Odyssey. This lotus has been used to produce perfumes since ancient times; it is also used in aromatherapy.

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Thursday, 25 June 2020

FFF447 - TORCH GINGER

Etlingera elatior (also known as Torch Ginger, Ginger Flower, Red Ginger Lily, Torch Lily, Wild Ginger, Combrang, Bunga Kantan, Philippine Wax Flower, Xiang Bao Jiaing, Indonesian Tall Ginger, Boca de Dragón, Rose de Porcelaine, Porcelain Rose) is a species of herbaceous perennial plant. Botanical synonyms include Nicolaia elatior, Phaeomeria magnifica, Nicolaia speciosa, Phaeomeria speciosa, Alpinia elatior, Alpinia magnifica!

The showy pink flowers are used in decorative arrangements while the flower buds are an important ingredient in the Nonya dish laksa. In North Sumatra, the flower buds are used for a dish called arsik ikan mas (Andaliman/Szechuan pepper Spiced Carp). It is known in Indonesian as bunga kecombrang or honje, Malay as bunga kantan and Thai as daalaa.

In Thailand it is eaten in a kind of Thai salad preparation. In Karo, it is known as asam cekala (asam meaning 'sour'), and the flower buds, but more importantly the ripe seed pods, which are packed with small black seeds, are an essential ingredient of the Karo version of sayur asam, and are particularly suited to cooking fresh fish.

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Thursday, 18 June 2020

FFF446 - DIANTHUS

Dianthus amurensis is a short-lived perennial dianthus that is similar to Dianthus chinensis except for its perennial habit and purple-pink flowers that are often solitary. It is native to the Amur River region of Siberia. Genus name comes from the Greek words Dios meaning "of Zeus" and anthos meaning flower. Specific epithet means from the Amur River area in eastern Asia.

'Siberian Blue' (frequently sold in commerce as 'Siberian Blues') is an Amur pink cultivar that produces reddish-violet to lavender-blue flowers on stems rising to 30 cm tall over a bushy sprawling mound of lance-shaped green leaves (each to 5 cm long). Flowers bloom solitary or in three-flowered inflorescences. Flowers typically bloom from late spring to frost. This is a striking dianthus that is eye-catching and unusual. The lilac-coloured flowers form a wonderful display in a garden bed or in a rockery.

Amur pinks are short-lived perennials that may be grown from seed. They are best grown in gritty, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun. Drought tolerant once established. Start seed indoors 6-8 weeks before last spring frost date. Set out seedlings and/or purchased plants 1-2 weeks before last spring frost date. Plantings are less apt to burn out in poorly drained soils or in hot and humid summers than some other species of dianthus. Deadhead spent flowers to prolong bloom. When flowering declines, plants may be sheared to promote additional bloom.

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Thursday, 11 June 2020

FFF445 - PINK HYACINTH ORCHID

Dipodium roseum, commonly known as pink hyacinth orchid, in the family Orchidaceae is a leafless mycoheterotrophic orchid found in east and south-eastern Australia. The species was formally described in 1991. The type specimen was collected in Montrose in Victoria's Dandenong Ranges. The species was previously included in a wider circumscription of Dipodium punctatum.

For most of the year, plants are dormant and have no above-ground presence. Below the ground lie fleshy roots. Flower spikes ranging from 30 to 90 cm in height appear between December and April. These racemose inflorescences have 15 to 40 pink flowers with small darker spots. The sepals and petals are strongly recurved and the three-lobed labellum is pink with dark lines and a band of mauve hairs. A rare white-flowering form also exists. 

Pollination of this species, as for all species in the genus, is by native bees and wasps. No leafless species of Dipodium has been sustained in cultivation due to the inability to replicate its association with mycorrhizal fungi in a horticultural context. I.e. it needs the wild underground fungi to nourish it as it has no leaves and cannot photosynthesise.

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Thursday, 4 June 2020

FFF444 - ROSA 'PINK INTUITION'

Rosa 'Pink Intuition' is a sport of 'Red Intuition', which was voted International Cut Rose of the Year 2000. Like its sister rose, 'Pink Intuition' is prized for the perfection of its large, perfect, classical Hybrid Tea-shaped flowers, all massed with petals. Tall graceful buds open into blooms, a whirling palette of pinks – bright, rich, magentas slashed with delicate and buoyant pastels – stripes of pinks on pink.

Flowering continually from Spring to late Autumn, stems are laden with bunches of bright, unfading blooms. Long flower stems are ideal for cutting, having an exceptionally long vase life. Flowers do not droop. Blessed with a vigorous growth habit, Pink Intuition thrives in full sun, relishes regular feeding and mulching. Pink Intuition may be planted all the year round. Grows to approximately 150 cm high.

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Thursday, 28 May 2020

FFF443 - CHRYSANTHEMUM

There are about 40 species in the genus Chrysanthemum, mainly from East Asia. In China, where they have been cultivated for over 2,500 years, the chrysanthemum was used medicinally and for flavouring, as well as for ornament. The flower is also significant in Japan where it is a symbol of happiness and longevity, and the royal family has ruled for 2,600 years from the Chrysanthemum Throne.

The annual species are referred to Xanthophthalmum and are mainly used for summer bedding or as fillers in borders of perennial flowers. Most chrysanthemums are upright plants with lobed leaves that can be aromatic. The many showy flowerheads, carried at the tips of strong stems, begin to bloom as the days shorten. In the Southern Hemisphere, they bloom in May and are associated with Mother's Day.

Florists chrysanthemums (Chrysanthemum grandiflorum) are grouped according to form: Irregular incurved, reflexed, regular incurved, intermediate incurved, pompon, single and semi-double, anemone, spoon, quill, spider, brush or thistle, and unclassified, which is a catch-all group for blooms not yet classified or not falling into one of the existing groups.

Florists chrysanthemums prefer a heavier richer soil in a sunny position, though they like a spot that offers some afternoon shade. The plants require training and trimming to produce their best flowers. Pinch back when young and disbud to ensure the best flower show. Propagate by division when dormant or from half-hardened summer cuttings.

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Thursday, 21 May 2020

FFF442 - WINTRY BOUQUET

I guess we are fortunate in Melbourne as our Winters are never heavy, with the seasonal cold and rain quite tolerable. If it snows in the City it is first page news, so we're lucky there too. This generally means that whatever the season, fresh flowers are available locally (even if some of them have been forced to blossom - the Spring bulbs, for example).

This wintry bouquet has violet-coloured Dutch irises (Iris × hollandica), creamy white Alstroemeria (Alstroemeria × hybrida), and orange-pink Asiatic lilies (Asiatic lilies - Lilium asiaticum).

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Thursday, 14 May 2020

FFF441 - PURPLE CESTRUM

Cestrum is a genus of about 200 species of flowering plants in the family Solanaceae. They are native to warm temperate to tropical regions of the Americas, from the southernmost United States (Florida, Texas: Day-blooming Cestrum, C. diurnum) south to the Bío-Bío Region in central Chile (Green Cestrum, C. parqui). They are colloquially known as cestrums or jessamines (from "jasmine", due to their fragrant flowers).

They are shrubs growing to 1–4 m tall. Most are evergreen, a few are deciduous. All parts of the plants are toxic, causing severe gastroenteritis if eaten. The photo below is of the less common variety of Purple Cestrum (Cestrum x cultum 'Cretan Purple'). Compare this to the more common, green Cestrum nocturnum ('Lady of the Night'). The flowers of 'Cretan Purple' are violet/lavender in colour, and it will flower repeatedly over the Summer. Grow in a well-drained fertile soil in sun or part shade. Place in a sheltered position, such as against a sunny wall, or a sheltered border. It is frost-hardy.

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Thursday, 7 May 2020

FFF440 - AUTUMN ROSE

A "Mr Lincoln" rose blooming undaunted in the Autumn weather, surrounded by wind, rain and Autumn foliage. A special tribute to hard-working mums who continue to carry on and get it all done even in these critical times!

"Mr Lincoln" rose was bred by Swim & Weeks, USA in 1964.  This is a very tall growing rose to 1.8 metres should be planted at the back of the rose bed where it will shine over and above all the roses and the breath-taking fragrance will still be enjoyed. Mr. Lincoln has retained its popularity over the years because it is just so reliable a performer with very tough, leathery foliage, especially loving the heat. As with most dark red roses, Mr. Lincoln has very sharp thorns and produces huge, thick watershoots which should be pruned with loppers rather than secateurs.

HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY TO ALL
MUMS AND GRANDMUMS!

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Thursday, 30 April 2020

FFF439 - BLACKBERRY FLOWER

The blackberry is an edible fruit produced by many species in the Rubus genus in the Rosaceae family, hybrids among these species within the Rubus subgenus, and hybrids between the Rubus and Idaeobatus subgenera. The taxonomy of the blackberries has historically been confused because of hybridisation and apomixis, so that species have often been grouped together and called species aggregates. For example, the entire subgenus Rubus has been called the Rubus fruticosus aggregate, although the species R. fruticosus is considered a synonym of R. plicatus.

What distinguishes the blackberry from its raspberry relatives is whether or not the torus (receptacle or stem) 'picks-with' (i.e. stays with) the fruit. When picking a blackberry fruit, the torus does stay with the fruit. With a raspberry, the torus remains on the plant, leaving a hollow core in the raspberry fruit.

The beautiful metallic green beetle is a Chrysanthia spp., which is a genus of beetles belonging to the family Oedemeridae subfamily Nacerdinae. It could well be a C. viridissima. The common name of these is 'green false blister beetles'.

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Thursday, 23 April 2020

FFF438 - ECHIUM

Echium candicans (syn. Echium fastuosum J.Jacq.), commonly known as "pride of Madeira", is a species of flowering plant in the family Boraginaceae, native to the island of Madeira. It is a large herbaceous biennial subshrub, growing to 1.5–2.5 m, found in Madeira's far east.

In the first year after germination the plant produces a broad rosette of leaves. In the second and subsequent years more or less woody flowering stalks are produced clothed in rough leaves. The flower head is large and covered with blue flowers having red stamens. It is much visited by bees and butterflies for its nectar. White-flowered cultivars are also seen.

Echium candicans is cultivated in the horticulture trade and widely available throughout the world as an ornamental plant for traditional and drought tolerant water conserving gardens. It is particularly suitable for coastal planting, and is a popular ornamental in coastal California. With a minimum temperature requirement of 5–7 °C, in frost-prone areas it needs some winter protection. It has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.

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Thursday, 16 April 2020

FFF437 - SUNFLOWER

The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is an annual plant native to the Americas. It possesses a large inflorescence (flowering head), and its name is derived from the flower's shape and image, which is often used to capture the sun. The plant has a rough, hairy stem, broad, coarsely toothed, rough leaves, and circular flower heads. The heads consist of many individual flowers which mature into seeds, often in the hundreds, on a receptacle base. 

From the Americas, sunflower seeds were brought to Europe in the 16th century, where, along with sunflower oil, they became a widespread cooking ingredient. Leaves of the sunflower can be used as cattle feed, while the stems contain a fibre which may be used in paper production.

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Thursday, 9 April 2020

FFF436 - ROSA 'OLYMPIAD'

Rosa 'Olympiad', (aka MACauck ), is a hybrid tea rose cultivar, developed by Sam McGredy IV, and introduced into New Zealand by McGredy Roses International in 1974. The cultivar was named an All-America Rose Selections winner in 1984, and the recipient of the Portland Gold Medal in 1995.

'Olympiad' is a medium-tall, upright shrub, 60—120 cm in height with a 60—90 cm spread. Blooms are medium-large, with an average diameter of 10—12 cm, with 32 to 37 petals. Flowers are a dark red and have a mild tea fragrance. Blooms have a full high-centered bloom form, and are borne mostly solitary on long, upright stems. Foliage is large, matte, and medium green in colour. 'Olympiad' blooms in flushes throughout its growing season. The plant does best in USDA zone 5b and warmer. The rose does well in heat, unlike most dark red roses, is resistant to mildew, but prone to blackspot

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Thursday, 2 April 2020

FFF435 - TEA PLANT FLOWER

Camellia sinensis is a species of evergreen shrub or small tree whose leaves and leaf buds are used to produce tea. It is of the genus Camellia (Chinese: 茶花; pinyin: Cháhuā, literally: "tea flower") of flowering plants in the family Theaceae. Common names include "tea plant", "tea shrub", and "tea tree" (not to be confused with Melaleuca alternifolia, the source of tea tree oil, or Leptospermum scoparium, the New Zealand teatree).

Two major varieties are grown: Camellia sinensis var. sinensis for Chinese teas, and Camellia sinensis var. assamica for Indian Assam teas. White tea, yellow tea, green tea, oolong, pu-erh tea and black tea are all harvested from one or the other, but are processed differently to attain varying levels of oxidation. Kukicha (twig tea) is also harvested from Camellia sinensis, but uses twigs and stems rather than leaves.

Camellia sinensis is an evergreen shrub or small tree that is usually trimmed to below 2 m when cultivated for its leaves. It has a strong taproot. The flowers are yellow-white, 2.5–4 cm in diameter, with 7 to 8 petals. The seeds of Camellia sinensis and Camellia oleifera can be pressed to yield tea oil, a sweetish seasoning and cooking oil that should not be confused with tea tree oil, an essential oil that is used for medical and cosmetic purposes, and originates from the leaves of a different plant.

The leaves are 4–15 cm long and 2–5 cm broad. Fresh leaves contain about 4% caffeine, as well as related compounds including theobromine. The young, light green leaves are preferably harvested for tea production; they have short white hairs on the underside. Older leaves are deeper green. Different leaf ages produce differing tea qualities, since their chemical compositions are different. Usually, the tip (bud) and the first two to three leaves are harvested for processing. This hand picking is repeated every one to two weeks.

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Thursday, 26 March 2020

FFF434 - AUTUMN GARDEN

In these unfortunate times we are living through, we are experiencing a daily exposure to terrible news from around the world, but even more alarming are the news from our country, our own city, the suburb we live in. The Coronavirus Pandemic is making no distinctions and we are all at risk. Staying at home and limiting our exposure to the virus is the best way to deal with the pandemic.

If we are lucky enough to have a garden, we can venture there and take courage, relax and be revitalised in body and spirit from the green energy of the plants and the colour and fragrance of the flowers. If no garden is at hand, a bunch from flowers from the florist (I certainly hope they are listed as "essential services"!) or your nearest market can bring some cheer into your home.

My best wishes to you and those near and dear to you.

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Thursday, 19 March 2020

FFF433 - CORYMBIA

Corymbia ficifolia or the red flowering gum also known as Albany red flowering gum (previously known as Eucalyptus ficifolia) is one of the most commonly planted ornamental trees in the broader eucalyptus family. It is native to a very small area of south coastal Western Australia (measured in just tens of kilometres) to the east of Walpole (430 km Southeast of Perth), but is not considered under threat in the wild.

In nature Corymbia ficifolia prefers infertile, sandy soils but it is readily adaptable to most temperate locations, provided it is not exposed to severe frost or sustained tropical damp. It is an ideal street tree as it is hardy, moderately fast growing, and rarely grows large enough to require pruning.

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Thursday, 12 March 2020

FFF432 - AUSTRALIAN FLAME PEA

Chorizema cordatum, known as the heart-leaf flame pea or Australian flame pea, is a flowering plant of the Fabaceae (pea family), endemic to gravelly or loamy soils in eucalyptus forests, in the moist south western parts of Western Australia. It is a bushy, evergreen shrub. The attractive and noticeable flowers appear in late winter or spring in long racemes. Either starting at the end of stems or from the leaf axils.

Flowers are orange and red, 10 to 12 mm in diameter. The heart shaped (or narrower) leaves are 3 to 5 cm long with somewhat wavy edges. It can be grown as a garden plant, and does well in other parts of the country, (such as Sydney on the other side of the Australian continent). However, a summer with lower humidity is better suited for this plant. Propagation from seed is easily achieved, and cuttings strike well. This plant has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.

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Thursday, 5 March 2020

FFF431 - CAPEWEED

Arctotheca calendula is a plant in the sunflower family commonly known as capeweed, plain treasureflower, cape dandelion, or cape marigold because it originates from the Cape Province in South Africa. It is also found in neighbouring KwaZulu-Natal.

Arctotheca calendula is naturalised in California, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Australia, and New Zealand, and considered a noxious weed in some of those places. It is a squat perennial or annual which grows in rosettes and sends out stolons and can spread across the ground quickly. The leaves are covered with white woolly hairs, especially on their undersides. The leaves are lobed or deeply toothed. Hairy stems bear daisy-like flowers with small yellow petals that sometimes have a green or purple tint surrounded by white or yellow ray petals extending further out from the flower centres.

It is cultivated as an attractive ornamental groundcover but has invasive potential when introduced to a new area. The plant can reproduce vegetatively or via seed. Seed-bearing plants are most likely to become weedy, taking hold most easily in bare or sparsely vegetated soil or disturbed areas.

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Thursday, 27 February 2020

FFF430 - RED FLOWERING GUM

Corymbia ficifolia or the red flowering gum also known as Albany red flowering gum (previously known as Eucalyptus ficifolia) is one of the most commonly planted ornamental trees in the broader eucalyptus family. In 2009, genetic studies showed that C. ficifolia comprises a natural group with two other Western Australian species C. calophylla and C. haematoxylon. The group was classified as section Calophyllae within the subgenus Corymbia.

It is native to a very small area of south coastal Western Australia (measured in just tens of kilometres) to the east of Walpole (430 km Southeast of Perth), but is not considered under threat in the wild. In nature Corymbia ficifolia prefers infertile, sandy soils but it is readily adaptable to most temperate locations, provided it is not exposed to severe frost or sustained tropical damp. It is an ideal street tree as it is hardy, moderately fast growing, and rarely grows large enough to require pruning. The largest known single-stemmed tree in the world (216.5 cm diameter) is located on Princes Street in Hamilton, New Zealand.

Because of its big and lovely colourful flowers, genetic improvement for cold resistance in Dublin area in Ireland is being carrying out by collecting seeds from Western and Southern Australia in the coldest parts of Australia where it grows. In Ireland most of the plants were killed by severe frosts but the surviving shoots have been kept alive by tissue culture in order to produce the desired strain.

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Thursday, 20 February 2020

FFF429 - WAX FLOWER

Philotheca is a genus of about 45 species, all of which occur only in Australia. The genus has been recently increased in number by the transfer of about 39 species from the genus Eriostemon. Transferred species include Philotheca myoporoides which was previously known as Eriostemon myoporoides.

Philotheca buxifolia, commonly known as Box-leaf Waxflower, is a shrub in the family Rutaceae. It produces white or pink flowers. The species occurs for the most part around Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, however, it has been introduced as a garden ornamental plant in many locations around Australia.

The plant thrives in a range of climates from sub-tropical to cool-temperate. It prefers well-drained soils in full sun or part shade. Dislikes root disturbance. Can be tip pruned to promote a bushy habit, however, if pruned too hard they can be slow to recover. Can be affected by scale. Profuse flowers make this a good feature plant. Also suited to containers or as a hedge.

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Thursday, 13 February 2020

FFF428 - ROSES ARE RED...

While visiting the Victorian State Rose Garden, I took some photos of some brilliantly red roses, perhaps none so intense as this variety, "Grande Amore". It was bred by Tim Hermann Kordes (Germany, 1995) and introduced in Germany by W. Kordes' Söhne (Retail) in 2004. Introduced in United States by Wayside Gardens in 2008 as 'Grande Amore'.

This is a standout among red hybrid tea roses, acclaimed for its depth of colour and exceptional disease resistance. It produces continuous flushes of dark red, pointed buds, which open into high- centred blooms of a shiny, intense red, set off by deep green glossy leaves. It is a moderately fragrant rose and can be used readily as a cut flower.

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Happy Valentine's Day!


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Thursday, 6 February 2020

FFF427 - FUCHSIA GUM

Eucalyptus forrestiana, commonly known as Fuchsia Gum, Forrest's Mallee or Forrest's Marlock, is a small tree which occurs in an area near Esperance in Western Australia. It was named after George Forrest (1873-1932). It is a mallee Eucalyptus with smooth bark and grows to between 1.5 and to 6 metres in height. It has bright red buds and yellow flowers which appear between summer and winter.

Two closely related species, E. dolichorhyncha and E. stoatei, have been treated as subspecies in the past. It is a pretty multi-stemmed native tree with a dark green canopy and smooth grey bark. It produces brilliant flowers in summer that are red caps and yellow flowers in summer and winter. Great as a streetscape tree or suited to a garden, adding colour and drama. It prefers well-drained sandy soils. It is drought and frost tolerant and copes with limited waterlogging. Flowers and fruit are useful as cut flowers.

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Thursday, 30 January 2020

FFF426 - WATER LILY

Nymphaea (water lily) is a genus of hardy and tender aquatic plants in the family Nymphaeaceae. There are about 50 species in the genus, which has a cosmopolitan distribution. White-flowered waterlilies (of several species) are the national flower of Bangladesh.

The name Nymphaea comes from the Greek term "Νυμφαία", possibly related to "Νύμφη" meaning "nymph". The nymphs in Greek mythology were supernatural feminine beings associated with springs, so the application of the name to delicately flowered aquatic plants is understandable. Despite its common name "water lily" (water-lily, waterlily), Nymphaea is not related to the true lily, Lilium.

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Thursday, 23 January 2020

FFF425 - WISTERIA

Wisteria (also spelled Wistaria or Wysteria) is a genus of flowering plants in the pea family, Fabaceae, that includes ten species of woody climbing bines native to the Eastern United States and to China, Korea, and Japan. Some species are popular ornamental plants, especially in China and Japan. The botanist Thomas Nuttall said he named the genus Wisteria in memory of Dr. Caspar Wistar (1761–1818). Questioned about the spelling later, Nuttall said it was for "euphony", but his biographer speculated that it may have something to do with Nuttall's friend Charles Jones Wister, Sr, of Grumblethorpe, the grandson of the merchant John Wister.

Wisteria sinensis, shown here flowers in the spring (just before or as the leaves open). Here is a Summer-flowering plant, which is in our neighbour's garden presently. Our squiffy weather may have something to do with the unseasonal blooming! The flowers of this species are fragrant, and the seeds are produced in pods similar to those of Laburnum, and, like the seeds of that genus, are poisonous. Wisteria is an extremely hardy plant that is considered an invasive species in many parts of the world.

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Thursday, 16 January 2020

FFF424 - DAISIES

Argyranthemum (marguerite, marguerite daisy, dill daisy) is a genus of flowering plants belonging to the family Asteraceae. Members of this genus are sometimes also placed in the genus Chrysanthemum. The genus is endemic to Macaronesia, occurring only on the Canary Islands, the Savage Islands, and Madeira.

Argyranthemum frutescens is recorded as a food plant of the leaf-mining larva of the moth Bucculatrix chrysanthemella. Varieties and cultivars of Argyranthemum (sometimes listed under A. frutescens) are widely sold as garden plants, for summer bedding or containers. They produce prolific single- or double-flowered daisy-like flowers in shades of white, pink, yellow and purple throughout summer. They are generally half-hardy, and can be grown from seed or cuttings, or purchased as young plants to be planted out after all danger of frost has passed.

Several cultivars have gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit. Illustrated here is the cultivar Marguerite Daisy 'Madeira® (Argyranthemum frutescens) 'Crested Merlot', which blooms prolifically. This is an easily grown variety that is particularly suited for pots and planters.

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Thursday, 9 January 2020

FFF423 - YARROW

Achillea millefolium, commonly known as yarrow or common yarrow, is a flowering plant in the family Asteraceae. It is native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere in Asia, Europe, and North America. It has been introduced as a feed for live stock in places like New Zealand and Australia. However, it is a weed in those places and sometimes also in its native regions.

In New Mexico and southern Colorado, it is called plumajillo (Spanish for 'little feather') from its leaf shape and texture. In antiquity, yarrow was known as herba militaris, for its use in stanching the flow of blood from wounds. Other common names for this species include gordaldo, nosebleed plant, old man's pepper, devil's nettle, sanguinary, milfoil, soldier's woundwort, thousand-leaf, and thousand-seal.

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Thursday, 2 January 2020

FFF422 - JUBILEE CELEBRATION ROSE

Rosa Jubilee Celebration ('Aushunter') (Pbr) is an exceptionally free-flowering rose named to commemorate the Queen's Golden Jubilee. It produces a mass of golden-flushed, pink blooms through the summer, each held clear of the foliage on stout stems. Their scent is strong and fruity.

A vigorous and healthy shrub rose that will provide months of colour in the border.Position: Full sun; Soil: Fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained; Rate of growth: Fast-growing; Flowering period: June to September; Flower colour: Salmon-pink; Other features: Excellent cut-flowers; Hardiness: Fully hardy.

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