The rules for posting are simple!

1. Every Friday post a photo that includes one or more flowers.
2. Please only post photos you have authority to use.
3. Include a link to this blog in your post - http://floralfridayfoto.blogspot.com/
4. Leave the link to your FloralFridayFoto post below on inlinkz.
5. Visit other blogs listed ... comment & enjoy!

When to Post:
inlinkz will be available every Thursday and will remain open until the next Wednesday.

Thursday, 10 January 2019

FFF372 - ROSA 'FRIESIA'

Rosa 'Friesia' (synonyms: 'Sunsprite'; 'KORresia') is a rose variety developed by Reimer Kordes and introduced in 1973. The rose was derived from the cultivars 'Friedrich Wörlein' × 'Spanish Sun', and is one of the most successful floribunda roses. It was named 'Friesia' after the region Frisia (Friesland), the home of the breeder, and was one of the first roses to be given a code name (KORresia for Kordes).

Its sunny yellow blooms are large and flat with 17 to 25 waved petals, reaching an average diameter of 8 cm and have a very strong fragrance. The high-centred flowers appear solitary or in small clusters in a blooming period lasting from June to September. Their bright yellow colour hardly changes with age. The flower is not well suited as a cut flower as it has short stems and only lasts for a short period of time after cutting.

The plant has light-green, glossy leaves, forms upright, bushy shrubs with about 40 to 75 cm height and up to 60 cm width, is very disease resistant and hardy (USDA zone 6b) and can be grown on the ground or in containers. It is used as a parent rose, leading to cultivars such as Rosa 'Sun Flare' (Warriner 1981) and 'Morden Sunrise' (Davidson & Collicutt) 1991.

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Thursday, 3 January 2019

FFF371 - ROSA 'BOSCOBEL'

Rosa 'Boscobel' is a vigorous and healthy variety from David Austin English roses, and is an upright shrub with dark green, glossy foliage. It produces perfectly formed rich salmon rosettes. These delightful blooms are upward-facing and carried on strong stems. An exceptional medium size shrub that is quick to establish. Repeat flowering from late spring to autumn.  It has a strong fragrance (complex myrrh) and will prove to be an irresistible addition to your garden once you've seen it and smelt it.

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Thursday, 27 December 2018

FFF370 - IVY FLOWERS

Hedera helix (common ivy, English ivy, European ivy, or just ivy) is a species of flowering plant in the family Araliaceae, native to most of Europe and western Asia. A rampant, clinging evergreen vine, it is a familiar sight in gardens, waste spaces, on house walls, tree trunks and in wild areas across its native habitat. It is labeled as an invasive species in a number of areas where it has been introduced.

The flowers are produced from late summer until late autumn, individually small, in 3-to-5 cm-diameter umbels, greenish-yellow, and very rich in nectar, an important late autumn food source for bees and other insects. The fruit are purple-black to orange-yellow berries 6–8 mm in diameter, ripening in late winter, and are an important food for many birds, though somewhat poisonous to humans. One to five seeds are in each berry, which are dispersed after being eaten by birds.

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BEST WISHES TO EVERYONE FOR THE FESTIVE SEASON!
MAY THE NEW YEAR 2019 BE FULL OF HEALTH, HAPPINESS AND REPLETE WITH FLOWERS!

Thursday, 20 December 2018

FFF369 - LACEBARK TREE

Brachychiton discolor is a rainforest tree of eastern Australia in the family Sterculiaceae. It grows in drier rainforest areas, scattered from Paterson, New South Wales (32° S) to Mackay, Queensland (21° S). There's also an isolated community of these trees at Cape York Peninsula. Common names include Lacebark Tree, Lace Kurrajong, Pink Kurrajong, Scrub Bottle Tree, White Kurrajong, Hat Tree and Sycamore.

An attractive tree up to 30 metres tall featuring pink flowers without petals. The trunk is straight, grey and cylindrical, up to 75 cm in diameter. Not buttressed at the base. Twigs hairy, brown and smooth. Leaves are hairy; lobed in three, five or seven points, 10 to 20 cm in diameter. Whitish underneath, dark green above. Leaf veins visible on both sides.

Flowers form from November to February. The flowers are pink, almost without stalks, 3 to 4 cm in diameter. Separate male and female flowers occur, without petals. The fruit is a hairy boat-shaped follicle maturing from December to July. It is 7 to 20 cm long, containing up to 30 seeds, 9 mm long. Germination from fresh seed occurs without difficulty. It is widely planted as an ornamental tree. Wood used as shields by Indigenous Australians. The roasted seeds are edible by humans.

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I would like to extend to you my best wishes for the Festive Season. If you celebrate Christmas, may you have a peaceful and happy time together with those you love.

Thursday, 13 December 2018

FFF368 - ORIENTAL LILIES

Lilium (members of which are true lilies) is a genus of herbaceous flowering plants in the Liliaceae family growing from bulbs, all with large prominent flowers. Lilies are a group of flowering plants which are important in culture and literature in much of the world. Most species are native to the temperate northern hemisphere, though their range extends into the northern subtropics. Many other plants have "lily" in their common name but are not related to true lilies.

Oriental lilies seen here, are based on hybrids within Lilium section Archelirion, specifically Lilium auratum and Lilium speciosum, together with crossbreeds from several species native to Japan, including Lilium nobilissimum, Lilium rubellum, Lilium alexandrae, and Lilium japonicum. They are fragrant, and the flowers tend to be outward facing. Plants tend to be tall, and the flowers may be quite large. The whole group are sometimes referred to as "stargazers" because many of them appear to look upwards.

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Thursday, 6 December 2018

FFF367 - TEATREE

Leptospermum is a genus of flowering trees and shrubs in the family Myrtaceae, which is native to Australia, New Zealand. Called "tea tree" because Captain James Cook in the 18th century brewed a tea from the leaves and gave it to his crew as a scurvy preventative. These are substantial and useful plants all year round; soft and casual looking (never rigid or formal). Most make a display of five-petalled single flowers (somewhat like tiny wild roses) along stems among the small leaves. Petals surround a hard central cone or cup that matures to a woody seed capsule that hangs on for a long time after the petals drop. Flowers are typically white, pink, or red.

Shown here is the hybrid 'Burgundy Queen'. Few drought resistant shrubs can rival the colour of 'Burgundy Queen.' Everything about it is majestic and burgundy. Its profuse, fully double flowers are intense dark burgundy, and the fine foliage of this large shrub is also burgundy flushed. It originates from New Zealand where it grows in a wide range of areas from peaty bogs to coastal and montane regions. So, it is surprisingly adaptable, especially to arid sites and soils.

Tea tree is a large shrub to small tree that develops an untamed grace when allowed to maintain its naturally irregular form. Bloom time is variable. South of the equator it blooms from Spring through to Summer, but in the southwestern United States it tends to bloom from Autumn to Spring. The double burgundy blooms are small and densely line the branches.

Tea tree grows quickly if given full to partial sun and acid to neutral soil with average to good drainage. It will withstand arid coastal and inland conditions but grows more vigorously if well-watered. In highly arid regions, it is best to provide protection from hot afternoon sun. Use tea tree to flesh out mixed borders and dry gardens. It is excellent for erosion control but not in wildfire hazard zones as it is oil-rich and volatile. Allow tea trees to grow naturally. Many a well-intentioned gardener has “tidied" them up with shears or clippers thus spoiling their natural shape while creating more long-term maintenance for these otherwise carefree plants.

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Thursday, 29 November 2018

FFF366 - DIETES

Dietes bicolor (variously known as African iris or fortnight lily) is a clump-forming rhizomatous perennial plant with long sword-like pale-green leaves, growing from multiple fans at the base of the clump. This species belongs to the Iridaceae (Iris) family. It can form large clumps if left undisturbed for years.

This species is common in horticulture in its native South Africa, where it is often used in public gardens, beautification of commercial premises and along roadsides. The blooms are yellow with three dark purple spots, each surrounded by an orange outline, and are followed by a capsule that may bend the flower stalks to the ground. Ripe seeds (dark brown in colour) are dispersed when the capsule dries and splits. The leaves of Dietes bicolor are narrower than those of Dietes grandiflora and Dietes iridioides, and tend to arch more.

Some species of Dietes are considered "environmental weeds" in parts of Australia, particularly Western Australia, Queensland, and Lord Howe Island.

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Thursday, 22 November 2018

FFF365 - RED POPPY

Papaver somniferum, the opium poppy, is the species of plant from which opium and poppy seeds are derived. Opium is the source of many drugs, including morphine (and its derivative heroin), thebaine, codeine, papaverine, and noscapine. The Latin botanical name means the "sleep-bringing poppy", referring to the sedative properties of some of these opiates.

The opium poppy is the only species of Papaveraceae that is an agricultural crop grown on a large scale. Other species, Papaver rhoeas and Papaver argemone, are important agricultural weeds, and may be mistaken for the crop. This poppy is also valuable for ornamental purposes, and has been known as the "common garden poppy", referencing all the group of poppy plants.

Poppy seeds of Papaver somniferum are an important food item and the source of poppy seed oil, a healthy edible oil that has many uses.

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Thursday, 15 November 2018

FFF364 - ALSTROEMERIA

Alstroemeria, commonly called the Peruvian lily or lily of the Incas, is a genus of flowering plants in the family Alstroemeriaceae. They are all native to South America. Almost all of the species are restricted to one of two distinct centres of diversity, one in central Chile, the other in eastern Brazil. Species of Alstroemeria from Chile are winter-growing plants while those of Brazil are summer-growing. All are long-lived perennials except Alstroemeria graminea, a diminutive annual from the Atacama Desert of Chile.

The genus was named after the Swedish baron Clas Alströmer (1736 – 1794) by his close friend Carolus Linnaeus. Many hybrids and at least 190 cultivars have been developed, featuring many different markings and colours, including white, yellow, orange, apricot, pink, red, purple, and lavender. The most popular and showy hybrids commonly grown today result from crosses between species from Chile (winter-growing) with species from Brazil (summer-growing). This strategy has overcome the problem of seasonal dormancy and resulted in plants that are evergreen, or nearly so, and flower for most of the year. This breeding work derives mainly from trials that began in the United States in the 1980s. The flower, which resembles a miniature lily, is very popular for bouquets and flower arrangements in the commercial cut flower trade.

Shown here is the hybrid 'Indian Summer'. This variety has a strong upright habit and produces pale orange to yellow flowers set against unique bronze foliage. Height 70-100cm spread 30-70cm. Plant in part-shade, fertilise regularly and do not allow the soil to dry out.

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Thursday, 8 November 2018

FFF363 - PINCUSHION PROTEA

Leucospermum is a genus of evergreen upright, sometimes creeping shrubs that is assigned to the Proteaceae, with currently forty-eight known species. Almost all species are easily recognised as Leucospermum because of the long protruding styles with a thickened pollen-presenter, which jointly give the flower head the appearance of a pincushion, its common name. Pincushions can be found in South Africa, Swaziland, Zimbabwe and Mozambique.

Currently, the genus is subdivided in nine sections based on morphological commonalities and differences, each section having several species. The classification becomes more complex when garden hybrids are considered. Leucospermum pluridens 'Gold Fever' is shown here and is a large upright evergreen shrub of up to 3 m high. It has leathery, oblong to wedge-shaped leaves about 7½ cm long and 2½ cm wide, deeply incised near the tip with seven to ten teeth.

It has initially yellow, later carmine coloured flower heads. The 2 cm long bracts have slender, recurved tips. From the centre of the perianth emerge long styles that jointly give the impression of a pincushion. It is called Robinson pincushion in English and Robinson-kreupelhout in Afrikaans. Flowers can be found between September and December. It naturally occurs in the south of South Africa.

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