The rules for posting are simple!

1. Every Friday post a photo that includes one or more flowers.
2. Please only post photos you have authority to use.
3. Include a link to this blog in your post - http://floralfridayfoto.blogspot.com/
4. Leave the link to your FloralFridayFoto post below on inlinkz.
5. Visit other blogs listed ... comment & enjoy!

When to Post:
inlinkz will be available every Thursday and will remain open until the next Wednesday.

Thursday, 24 September 2020

FFF460 - BLUE SAGE

Salvia guaranitica (Anise-scented sage, Hummingbird sage, blue sage) in the Lamiaceae family is a species of Salvia native to a wide area of South America, including Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Argentina. It is a perennial subshrub growing 1.2 to 1.5 m tall, spreading into a large patch through its spreading roots. The leaves are ovate, 4 cm long and nearly as wide, with a fresh mint green colour, and an anise scent when crushed.

The inflorescences are up to 25 cm long with flowers in various shades of blue, including an uncommonly true blue. In cold regions, flowering begins in mid summer and continues until frost. Salvia guaranitica is a popular ornamental plant in mild areas. It grows in either full or three quarter sunlight, in well drained soil. Numerous cultivars have been selected, including 'Argentine Skies' (pale blue flowers), 'Black and Blue' (very dark violet blue calyx), 'Blue Ensign' (large blue flowers), and 'Purple Splendor' (Light purple flowers). The cultivar 'Blue Enigma', with pure blue flowers, has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.

Join me for Floral Friday Fotos by linking your flower photos below, and please leave a comment once you have done so.
If you take part in the meme, please show an active link back to this site on your own blog post!


You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter

Thursday, 17 September 2020

FFF459 - DIGIPLEXIS

Digiplexis ‘Illumination Flame’ is an award-winning foxglove hybrid that produces large multicoloured blooms from mid-Spring until first frost. ‘Illumination Flame’ was bred by Charles Valin at Thompson & Morgan in the United Kingdom and is a cross between Digitalis and the Mediterranean shrub Isoplexis. The ground-breaking new hybrid resulted in a well basal branched, vigorous, beautifully coloured and long blooming foxglove.

The real breeding breakthrough is unlike Digitalis, which bloom for a few weeks, Digiplexis flowers for several months. Flowering begins in the mid spring and continues throughout the summer and until the first hard frost. Digiplexis grows numerous spikes with, as its name implies, flame coloured sterile blossoms. The 2-inch tubular, hooded flowers have rich fuchsia-pink tones on the outside, while the inside of the blooms transition from fuchsia pink to golden apricot throats streaked with lavender spots.

Digiplexis ‘Illumination Flame’ is vegetatively cultivated by means of tissue culture. Propagation is done by a limited number of licensed propagators and self-propagation is strictly prohibited. The blossoms are sterile hybrids and do not produce seeds. Digiplexis can be grown as a perennial throughout USDA Hardiness Zones 8 to 11. However, with its long bloom time, don’t underestimate its value as an annual, tender perennial or a spectacular container plant in colder climates. It prefers locations with partial to full sun and grows to about 1 metre tall when in full bloom.

Join me for Floral Friday Fotos by linking your flower photos below, and please leave a comment once you have done so.
If you take part in the meme, please show an active link back to this site on your own blog post!

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter

Thursday, 10 September 2020

FFF 458 - ADENIUM

Adenium obesum is a species of flowering plant in the dogbane family, Apocynaceae, that is native to the Sahel regions, south of the Sahara (from Mauritania and Senegal to Sudan), and tropical and subtropical eastern and southern Africa and Arabia. Common names include Sabi star, kudu, mock azalea, impala lily and desert rose.

It is an evergreen or drought-deciduous succulent shrub (which can also lose its leaves during cold spells, or according to the subspecies or cultivar). It can grow to 1–3 m in height, with pachycaul stems and a stout, swollen basal caudex. The leaves are spirally arranged, clustered toward the tips of the shoots, simple entire, leathery in texture, 5–15 cm long and 1–8 cm broad. The flowers are tubular, 2–5 cm long, with the outer portion 4–6 cm diameter with five petals, resembling those of other related genera such as Plumeria and Nerium. The flowers tend to red and pink, often with a whitish blush outward of the throat.

Adenium obesum is a popular houseplant and bonsai in temperate regions. It requires a sunny location and a minimum indoor temperature in winter of 10 °C. It thrives on a xeric watering regime as required by cacti. A. obesum is typically propagated by seed or stem cuttings. The numerous hybrids are propagated mainly by grafting on to seedling rootstock. While plants grown from seed are more likely to have the swollen caudex at a young age, with time many cutting-grown plants cannot be distinguished from seedlings. This plant has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit. The toxic sap of its roots and stems is used as arrow poison for hunting large game throughout much of Africa, and as a fish toxin.

Join me for Floral Friday Fotos by linking your flower photos below, and please leave a comment once you have done so.
If you take part in the meme, please show an active link back to this site on your own blog post!

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter

Thursday, 3 September 2020

FFF 457 - HYACINTH

Hyacinthus is a small genus of bulbous flowering plants in the family Asparagaceae, subfamily Scilloideae. Plants are commonly called hyacinths. Hyacinthus is native to the eastern Mediterranean (from south Turkey to northern Israel), north-east Iran, and Turkmenistan.

The Dutch, or Common Hyacinth of house and garden culture (H. orientalis, native to southwest Asia) was so popular in the 18th century that over 2,000 cultivars were cultivated in the Netherlands, its chief commercial producer. This hyacinth has a single dense spike of fragrant flowers in shades of red, blue, white, orange, pink, violet, or yellow. A form of the common hyacinth is the less hardy and smaller blue- or white-petalled Roman hyacinth of florists.

These flowers should have indirect sunlight and are to be moderately watered.Several types of brodiea, squill, and other plants that were formerly classified in the lily family and have flower clusters borne along the stalk also have common names with hyacinth in them. Hyacinths should also not be confused with the genus Muscari, which are commonly known as grape hyacinths.

Join me for Floral Friday Fotos by linking your flower photos below, and please leave a comment once you have done so.
If you take part in the meme, please show an active link back to this site on your own blog post!

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter

Thursday, 27 August 2020

FFF 456 - JAPONICA

Chaenomeles japonica is a species of Japanese Quince in the Rosaceae family. It is a thorny deciduous shrub that is commonly cultivated. It is shorter than another commonly cultivated species C. speciosa, growing to only about 1 m in height. The fruit is called Kusa-boke (草木瓜) in Japanese. Chaenomeles japonica is also popularly grown in bonsai.

It is best known for its colourful spring flowers of red, white or pink. It produces apple-shaped fruit that are a golden-yellow colour containing red-brown seeds. The fruit is edible, but hard and astringent-tasting, unless bletted. The fruit is occasionally used in jelly and pie making as an inferior substitute for its cousin, the true quince, Cydonia oblonga.

Join me for Floral Friday Fotos by linking your flower photos below, and please leave a comment once you have done so.
If you take part in the meme, please show an active link back to this site on your own blog post!

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter

Thursday, 20 August 2020

FFF 455 - FUCHSIA

Fuchsia is a genus of flowering plants that consists mostly of shrubs or small trees. The first, Fuchsia triphylla, was discovered on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola (present day Dominican Republic and Haiti) in about 1696–1697 by the French Minim monk and botanist, Charles Plumier during his third expedition to the Greater Antilles. He named the new genus after the renowned German botanist Leonhart Fuchs (1501–1566).

There are currently almost 110 recognised species of Fuchsia. The vast majority are native to South America, but with a few occurring north through Central America to Mexico, and also several from New Zealand to Tahiti. One species, F. magellanica, extends as far as the southern tip of South America, occurring on Tierra del Fuego in the cool temperate zone, but the majority are tropical or subtropical. Most fuchsias are shrubs from 0.2–4 m tall, but one New Zealand species, the kōtukutuku (F. excorticata), is unusual in the genus in being a tree, growing up to 12–15 metres tall.

Join me for Floral Friday Fotos by linking your flower photos below, and please leave a comment once you have done so.
If  you take part in the meme, please show an active link back to this site on your own blog post!

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter

Thursday, 13 August 2020

FFF 454 - PERIWINKLES

Vinca major, with the common names bigleaf periwinkle, large periwinkle, greater periwinkle and blue periwinkle, is species of flowering plant in the family Apocynaceae, native to the western Mediterranean. Growing to 25 cm tall and spreading indefinitely, it is an evergreen perennial. Vinca major is a commonly grown ornamental plant in temperate gardens for its evergreen foliage, spring flowers, and groundcover or vine use. Many cultivars are available, with differences in flowers, such as white to dark violet flowers, and different patterns and colours of variegated foliage.

Blue periwinkle’s broad-leaved runners form a dense mat, shading out native plants and competing for moisture and nutrients. Its growth is particularly vigorous in riparian and other moist habitats. It competes with native plants for moisture, light, nutrients and recruitment niches. Its growth is particularly vigorous in riparian and other moist habitats.

Once established, periwinkle’s rampant growth is very difficult to control, especially in bushland. It occurs in southern Australia and into southeastern Queensland in regions with winter, summer or year-round rainfall, but its distribution does not extend into the semi-arid or alpine zones or the tropics. Extensive infestations have generally been recorded in regions receiving more than 600 mm annual rainfall. In drier areas it occurs along watercourses and drainage ditches and there are isolated records associated with plantings such as old or existing gardens.

Join me for Floral Friday Fotos by linking your flower photos below, and please leave a comment once you have done so.
If  you take part in the meme, please show an active link back to this site on your own blog post!

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter

Thursday, 6 August 2020

FFF 453 - OFFERING

While walking in the Darebin Parklands this morning, I came across this interesting arrangement of leaves and flowers in the midst of a circle of small stones. It was by the creek, under some gum trees and it immediately struck me as some sort of propitiatory offering to Mother Nature, or some sort of apotropaic symbol averting the evils of our times.

You can see sweet violets, fumitory, wild mustard flowers, buttercups and three-cornered leek flowers, all arranged within a circle of gum leaves.

Join me for Floral Friday Fotos by linking your flower photos below, and please leave a comment once you have done so.
If  you take part in the meme, please show an active link back to this site on your own blog post!

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter

Thursday, 30 July 2020

FFF 452 - HAIRPIN BANKSIA

The Hairpin Banksia (Banksia spinulosa) is a species of woody shrub, of the genus Banksia in the Proteaceae family, native to eastern Australia. Widely distributed, it is found as an understorey plant in open dry forest or heathland from Victoria to northern Queensland, generally on sandstone though sometimes also clay soils.

It generally grows as a small shrub to 2 metres in height, though can be a straggly tree to 6 metres. It has long narrow leaves with inflorescences which can vary considerably in coloration; while the spikes are gold or less commonly yellowish, the emergent styles may be a wide range of colours – from black, purple, red, orange or yellow.

Banksia spinulosa was named by James Edward Smith in England in 1793, after being collected by John White, most likely in 1792. He gave it the common name Prickly-leaved Banksia, though this has fallen out of use. With four currently recognised varieties, the species has had a complicated taxonomic history, with two varieties initially described as separate species in the early 19th century. A fourth, from the New England region, has only recently been described. However there has been disagreement whether one, var. cunninghamii, is distinct enough to once again have specific status.

The Hairpin Banksia is pollinated by and provides food for a wide array of vertebrate and invertebrate animals in the autumn and winter months. Its floral display and fine foliage have made it a popular garden plant with many horticultural selections available. With the recent trend towards smaller gardens, compact dwarf forms of Banksia spinulosa have become popular; the first available, Banksia 'Birthday Candles', has achieved a great deal of commercial success and wide recognition, and has been followed by several others.

Join me for Floral Friday Fotos by linking your flower photos below, and please leave a comment once you have done so.
If  you take part in the meme, please show an active link back to this site on your own blog post!

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter

Thursday, 23 July 2020

FFF 451 - DAISIES

The field daisy, Bellis perennis, is the symbol of purity and virginity, adoration and innocence. In the language of flowers, the daisy speaks the words: “I share your sentiments”.  It is under the dominion of Venus and in the past bruised leaves were applied to the testes to reduce swellings there! 

It is said, that Spring had not truly arrived until one could step over 12 daisy blooms under one foot on a lawn where they were growing...

Join me for Floral Friday Fotos by linking your flower photos below, and please leave a comment once you have done so.
If  you take part in the meme, please show an active link back to this site on your own blog post!

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter