The rules for posting are simple!

1. Every Friday post a photo that includes one or more flowers.
2. Please only post photos you have authority to use.
3. Include a link to this blog in your post - http://floralfridayfoto.blogspot.com/
4. Leave the link to your FloralFridayFoto post below on inlinkz.
5. Visit other blogs listed ... comment & enjoy!

When to Post:
inlinkz will be available every Thursday and will remain open until the next Wednesday.

Thursday, 28 May 2020

FFF443 - CHRYSANTHEMUM

There are about 40 species in the genus Chrysanthemum, mainly from East Asia. In China, where they have been cultivated for over 2,500 years, the chrysanthemum was used medicinally and for flavouring, as well as for ornament. The flower is also significant in Japan where it is a symbol of happiness and longevity, and the royal family has ruled for 2,600 years from the Chrysanthemum Throne.

The annual species are referred to Xanthophthalmum and are mainly used for summer bedding or as fillers in borders of perennial flowers. Most chrysanthemums are upright plants with lobed leaves that can be aromatic. The many showy flowerheads, carried at the tips of strong stems, begin to bloom as the days shorten. In the Southern Hemisphere, they bloom in May and are associated with Mother's Day.

Florists chrysanthemums (Chrysanthemum grandiflorum) are grouped according to form: Irregular incurved, reflexed, regular incurved, intermediate incurved, pompon, single and semi-double, anemone, spoon, quill, spider, brush or thistle, and unclassified, which is a catch-all group for blooms not yet classified or not falling into one of the existing groups.

Florists chrysanthemums prefer a heavier richer soil in a sunny position, though they like a spot that offers some afternoon shade. The plants require training and trimming to produce their best flowers. Pinch back when young and disbud to ensure the best flower show. Propagate by division when dormant or from half-hardened summer cuttings.

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Thursday, 21 May 2020

FFF442 - WINTRY BOUQUET

I guess we are fortunate in Melbourne as our Winters are never heavy, with the seasonal cold and rain quite tolerable. If it snows in the City it is first page news, so we're lucky there too. This generally means that whatever the season, fresh flowers are available locally (even if some of them have been forced to blossom - the Spring bulbs, for example).

This wintry bouquet has violet-coloured Dutch irises (Iris × hollandica), creamy white Alstroemeria (Alstroemeria × hybrida), and orange-pink Asiatic lilies (Asiatic lilies - Lilium asiaticum).

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Thursday, 14 May 2020

FFF441 - PURPLE CESTRUM

Cestrum is a genus of about 200 species of flowering plants in the family Solanaceae. They are native to warm temperate to tropical regions of the Americas, from the southernmost United States (Florida, Texas: Day-blooming Cestrum, C. diurnum) south to the Bío-Bío Region in central Chile (Green Cestrum, C. parqui). They are colloquially known as cestrums or jessamines (from "jasmine", due to their fragrant flowers).

They are shrubs growing to 1–4 m tall. Most are evergreen, a few are deciduous. All parts of the plants are toxic, causing severe gastroenteritis if eaten. The photo below is of the less common variety of Purple Cestrum (Cestrum x cultum 'Cretan Purple'). Compare this to the more common, green Cestrum nocturnum ('Lady of the Night'). The flowers of 'Cretan Purple' are violet/lavender in colour, and it will flower repeatedly over the Summer. Grow in a well-drained fertile soil in sun or part shade. Place in a sheltered position, such as against a sunny wall, or a sheltered border. It is frost-hardy.

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Thursday, 7 May 2020

FFF440 - AUTUMN ROSE

A "Mr Lincoln" rose blooming undaunted in the Autumn weather, surrounded by wind, rain and Autumn foliage. A special tribute to hard-working mums who continue to carry on and get it all done even in these critical times!

"Mr Lincoln" rose was bred by Swim & Weeks, USA in 1964.  This is a very tall growing rose to 1.8 metres should be planted at the back of the rose bed where it will shine over and above all the roses and the breath-taking fragrance will still be enjoyed. Mr. Lincoln has retained its popularity over the years because it is just so reliable a performer with very tough, leathery foliage, especially loving the heat. As with most dark red roses, Mr. Lincoln has very sharp thorns and produces huge, thick watershoots which should be pruned with loppers rather than secateurs.

HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY TO ALL
MUMS AND GRANDMUMS!

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Thursday, 30 April 2020

FFF439 - BLACKBERRY FLOWER

The blackberry is an edible fruit produced by many species in the Rubus genus in the Rosaceae family, hybrids among these species within the Rubus subgenus, and hybrids between the Rubus and Idaeobatus subgenera. The taxonomy of the blackberries has historically been confused because of hybridisation and apomixis, so that species have often been grouped together and called species aggregates. For example, the entire subgenus Rubus has been called the Rubus fruticosus aggregate, although the species R. fruticosus is considered a synonym of R. plicatus.

What distinguishes the blackberry from its raspberry relatives is whether or not the torus (receptacle or stem) 'picks-with' (i.e. stays with) the fruit. When picking a blackberry fruit, the torus does stay with the fruit. With a raspberry, the torus remains on the plant, leaving a hollow core in the raspberry fruit.

The beautiful metallic green beetle is a Chrysanthia spp., which is a genus of beetles belonging to the family Oedemeridae subfamily Nacerdinae. It could well be a C. viridissima. The common name of these is 'green false blister beetles'.

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Thursday, 23 April 2020

FFF438 - ECHIUM

Echium candicans (syn. Echium fastuosum J.Jacq.), commonly known as "pride of Madeira", is a species of flowering plant in the family Boraginaceae, native to the island of Madeira. It is a large herbaceous biennial subshrub, growing to 1.5–2.5 m, found in Madeira's far east.

In the first year after germination the plant produces a broad rosette of leaves. In the second and subsequent years more or less woody flowering stalks are produced clothed in rough leaves. The flower head is large and covered with blue flowers having red stamens. It is much visited by bees and butterflies for its nectar. White-flowered cultivars are also seen.

Echium candicans is cultivated in the horticulture trade and widely available throughout the world as an ornamental plant for traditional and drought tolerant water conserving gardens. It is particularly suitable for coastal planting, and is a popular ornamental in coastal California. With a minimum temperature requirement of 5–7 °C, in frost-prone areas it needs some winter protection. It has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.

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Thursday, 16 April 2020

FFF437 - SUNFLOWER

The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is an annual plant native to the Americas. It possesses a large inflorescence (flowering head), and its name is derived from the flower's shape and image, which is often used to capture the sun. The plant has a rough, hairy stem, broad, coarsely toothed, rough leaves, and circular flower heads. The heads consist of many individual flowers which mature into seeds, often in the hundreds, on a receptacle base. 

From the Americas, sunflower seeds were brought to Europe in the 16th century, where, along with sunflower oil, they became a widespread cooking ingredient. Leaves of the sunflower can be used as cattle feed, while the stems contain a fibre which may be used in paper production.

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Thursday, 9 April 2020

FFF436 - ROSA 'OLYMPIAD'

Rosa 'Olympiad', (aka MACauck ), is a hybrid tea rose cultivar, developed by Sam McGredy IV, and introduced into New Zealand by McGredy Roses International in 1974. The cultivar was named an All-America Rose Selections winner in 1984, and the recipient of the Portland Gold Medal in 1995.

'Olympiad' is a medium-tall, upright shrub, 60—120 cm in height with a 60—90 cm spread. Blooms are medium-large, with an average diameter of 10—12 cm, with 32 to 37 petals. Flowers are a dark red and have a mild tea fragrance. Blooms have a full high-centered bloom form, and are borne mostly solitary on long, upright stems. Foliage is large, matte, and medium green in colour. 'Olympiad' blooms in flushes throughout its growing season. The plant does best in USDA zone 5b and warmer. The rose does well in heat, unlike most dark red roses, is resistant to mildew, but prone to blackspot

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Thursday, 2 April 2020

FFF435 - TEA PLANT FLOWER

Camellia sinensis is a species of evergreen shrub or small tree whose leaves and leaf buds are used to produce tea. It is of the genus Camellia (Chinese: 茶花; pinyin: Cháhuā, literally: "tea flower") of flowering plants in the family Theaceae. Common names include "tea plant", "tea shrub", and "tea tree" (not to be confused with Melaleuca alternifolia, the source of tea tree oil, or Leptospermum scoparium, the New Zealand teatree).

Two major varieties are grown: Camellia sinensis var. sinensis for Chinese teas, and Camellia sinensis var. assamica for Indian Assam teas. White tea, yellow tea, green tea, oolong, pu-erh tea and black tea are all harvested from one or the other, but are processed differently to attain varying levels of oxidation. Kukicha (twig tea) is also harvested from Camellia sinensis, but uses twigs and stems rather than leaves.

Camellia sinensis is an evergreen shrub or small tree that is usually trimmed to below 2 m when cultivated for its leaves. It has a strong taproot. The flowers are yellow-white, 2.5–4 cm in diameter, with 7 to 8 petals. The seeds of Camellia sinensis and Camellia oleifera can be pressed to yield tea oil, a sweetish seasoning and cooking oil that should not be confused with tea tree oil, an essential oil that is used for medical and cosmetic purposes, and originates from the leaves of a different plant.

The leaves are 4–15 cm long and 2–5 cm broad. Fresh leaves contain about 4% caffeine, as well as related compounds including theobromine. The young, light green leaves are preferably harvested for tea production; they have short white hairs on the underside. Older leaves are deeper green. Different leaf ages produce differing tea qualities, since their chemical compositions are different. Usually, the tip (bud) and the first two to three leaves are harvested for processing. This hand picking is repeated every one to two weeks.

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Thursday, 26 March 2020

FFF434 - AUTUMN GARDEN

In these unfortunate times we are living through, we are experiencing a daily exposure to terrible news from around the world, but even more alarming are the news from our country, our own city, the suburb we live in. The Coronavirus Pandemic is making no distinctions and we are all at risk. Staying at home and limiting our exposure to the virus is the best way to deal with the pandemic.

If we are lucky enough to have a garden, we can venture there and take courage, relax and be revitalised in body and spirit from the green energy of the plants and the colour and fragrance of the flowers. If no garden is at hand, a bunch from flowers from the florist (I certainly hope they are listed as "essential services"!) or your nearest market can bring some cheer into your home.

My best wishes to you and those near and dear to you.

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