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1. Every Friday post a photo that includes one or more flowers.
2. Please only post photos you have authority to use.
3. Include a link to this blog in your post - http://floralfridayfoto.blogspot.com/
4. Leave the link to your FloralFridayFoto post below on inlinkz.
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When to Post:
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Thursday, 1 October 2015

FFF202 - PINK FAWN LILY

Erythronium revolutum is a species of flowering plant in the family Liliaceae, which is known by several common names, including mahogany fawn lily, coast fawn lily, and pink fawn lily. It is native to the west coast of North America.

Erythronium revolutum, a hardy perennial wildflower, grows from an oval-shaped bulb 3–5 cm long, producing usually two wide, flat, mottled green leaves near the ground. It is indigenous to Northwest Washington. The plant flowers between March and June. Each bulb sends up a long, naked stalk bearing one or two showy lily flowers. The stalk bows at the end so that the face of the flower points at the ground.

There are six tepals in shades of pink or light purple which may have yellow or white spotting toward the centre of the flower. The tepals may be straight or recurved so far that their tips meet behind the flower; they tend to recurve further as the flower ages. The anthers are bright yellow. E. revolutum can be distinguished from related species by its pink flowers, swollen anther filaments and mottled leaves. The fruit is a capsule up to 6 cm long.

Erythronium revolutum is cultivated as an ornamental plant, for use in traditional and natural gardens. Its combination of attractively patterned leaves and graceful flowers in mid spring make it a desirable plant. The best forms (often called var. johnstonii) have darker, richer pink flowers and well marked foliage. It should be planted in a shady spot (ideally beneath deciduous trees or shrubs) in humus-rich soil that does not dry out and is rather damp in spring. It will naturalise over time by self-seeding, though as seedlings take several years to reach flowering size this can be a slow process. This plant has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.

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19 comments:

  1. Such a lovely lily! I've never seen anything like it.

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  2. Native to my neck of the woods, you might say, but I've never seen or heard of this one. Pretty! I'll keep my eye out for it.

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  3. I like the colour! Have an nice weekend, dear Nick!

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  4. Oh how cute! I've never seen that flower before.

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  5. Hello Nick,
    I love little blossoms, your lily is so beauty!
    Have a nice weekend,
    moni

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  6. beautiful plant! not one I am familiar with.

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  7. What a beauty! Have a wonderful weekend.

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  8. A little beauty :) Spring favourite!

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  9. Beautiful!
    https://themomhood.wordpress.com/2015/10/02/floral-friday-fotos-pinks/

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  10. Pretty! I love learning about new flowers from your hop.

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  11. Such a beautiful flower !!!
    Happy weekend !

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