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1. Every Friday post a photo that includes one or more flowers.
2. Please only post photos you have authority to use.
3. Include a link to this blog in your post - http://floralfridayfoto.blogspot.com/
4. Leave the link to your FloralFridayFoto post below on inlinkz.
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When to Post:
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Thursday, 14 August 2014

FFF143 - HELLEBORE

Commonly known as hellebores, members of the Eurasian genus Helleborus comprise approximately 20 species of herbaceous or evergreen perennial flowering plants in the family Ranunculaceae, within which it gave its name to the tribe of Helleboreae. The scientific name Helleborus derives from the Greek name for H. orientalis "helleboros"; "elein" to injure and "bora" food, referrign to the fact that many species are poisonous. Despite names such as "Winter Rose", "Christmas rose" and "Lenten rose", hellebores are not closely related to the rose family (Rosaceae).

Hellebores are widely grown in gardens for decorative purposes. They are particularly valued by gardeners for their winter and early spring flowering period; the plants are surprisingly frost-resistant and many are evergreen. Also of value is their shade tolerance. Many species of hellebore have green or greenish-purple flowers and are of limited garden value, although Corsican hellebore (H. argutifolius), a robust plant with pale green, cup-shaped flowers and attractive leathery foliage, is widely grown. So is the 'stinking hellebore' or setterwort (H. foetidus), which has drooping clusters of small, pale green, bell-shaped flowers, often edged with maroon, which contrasts with its dark evergreen foliage.

H. foetidus 'Wester Flisk', with red-flushed flowers and flower stalks, is becoming popular, as are more recent selections with golden-yellow foliage. The so-called Christmas rose (H. niger), a traditional cottage garden favourite, bears its pure white flowers (which often age to pink) in the depths of winter; large-flowered cultivars are available, as are pink-flowered and double-flowered selections.

The most popular hellebores for garden use, however, are undoubtedly H. orientalis and its colourful hybrids (H. × hybridus). In the northern hemisphere, they flower in early spring, around the period of Lent, and are often known as Lenten hellebores, oriental hellebores, or Lenten roses. They are excellent for bringing early colour to shady herbaceous borders and areas between deciduous shrubs and under trees.

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11 comments:

  1. Me ha encantado tu post, tienes cosas muy interesantes, felicidades por tu bloc. Te invito a visitar el mio, esta semana acondicionamos un espacio en el jardin o la terraza para incorporar un chill out. De este modo, tendremos garantizado el máximo descanso durante nuestro tiempo libre. Ah! Si no eres seguidora espero que te hagas, gracias por visitarme.Te espero en Elracodeldetall.blogspot.com

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  2. Gorgeous flowers! Have a wonderful weekend everyone!

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  3. Such an original and beautiful flower :) Great photo :)

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  4. Helleborus come in so many wonderful colors and are one of my favorite spring plants. I still have a hard time with this northern/southern hemisphere stuff. Spring is fall and fall is spring...oh what ever! Tom The Backroads Traveller

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  5. Beautiful capture - heard that they're hard to eradicate from one's yard....

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  6. I love Helleborus! Yes, they bloom when nothing else blooms, even in the snow!

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  7. I love Helleborus too. It's such a gorgeous flower. Thank you for hosting and have a good start! Tamara

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  8. These are one of my favourite plants...year after year, they just return

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