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1. Every Friday post a photo that includes one or more flowers.
2. Please only post photos you have authority to use.
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Thursday, 24 July 2014

FFF140 - FUMITORY

Fumaria officinalis (common fumitory or earth smoke) is the most common species of the genus Fumaria in Western and Central Europe. It is a herbaceous annual plant, which grows weakly erect and scrambling, with stalks about 10 to 50 cm long. Its pink 7 to 9 mm flowers appear from April to October in the northern hemisphere. They are two lipped and spurred, with sepals running a quarter the length of the petals. The fruit is an achene. It contains alkaloids, potassium salts, and tannins. It is also a major source of fumaric acid.

The "smoky" or "fumy" origin of its name comes from the translucent color of its flowers, giving them the appearance of smoke or of hanging in smoke, and the slightly gray-blue haze color of its foliage, also resembling smoke coming from the ground, especially after morning dew.

The plant was already called fūmus terrae (smoke of the earth) in the early 13th century, and two thousand years ago, Dioscorides wrote in De Materia Medica (Περὶ ὕλης ἰατρικῆς) and Pliny the Elder in Naturalis Historia that rubbing the eyes with the sap or latex of the plant causes tears, like acrid smoke (fūmus) does to the eyes. Its Greek name is kapnos (καπνός, for smoke) and the name fumewort now applies mostly to the genus Corydalis, especially the similar looking Corydalis solida (formerly Fumaria bulbosa), which was thought to belong to the same genus as fumitory.

Join me for Floral Friday Fotos by linking your flower photos below, and please leave a comment once you have done so!

3 comments:

  1. Just wonderful this tiny flowers.
    Best regards, Synnöve

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hello,
    thanks for the naming for these wonderful flowers!
    Wish you a nice weekend,
    moni

    Thanks if you visit my blog
    http://www.reflexionblog.de

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi Nick, am I right in thinking that you write the occasional poem?
    I placed one on last week's floral friday post, but nobody mentioned it.
    Any point in combining words and pics?

    ReplyDelete