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1. Every Friday post a photo that includes one or more flowers.
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Thursday, 13 September 2012

FFF43 - WILD PLUM FLOWERS

Prunus americana, commonly called the American plum or wild plum, is a species of Prunus native to North America from Saskatchewan to New Mexico east to New Hampshire and Florida. It has often been planted outside its core range and sometimes escapes cultivation. Many cultivated varieties have been derived from this species. It forms an excellent stock upon which to graft the domestic plum.

The wild plum grows as a large shrub or small tree, reaching up to 4.6 m. It is adapted to coarse- and medium-textured soils, but not to fine soils. The shrub is winter-hardy, but has little tolerance for shade, drought, or fire. Its growth is most active in spring and summer, and it blooms in midspring. It propagates by seed, but the rate of spread by seed is slow.

The wild plum is used for both ornamental and culinary purposes. The white flowers are decorative in spring and its short, single leader makes it a popular residential landscape tree. Sargent says of it: "As an ornamental plant P. americana has real value; the long wand-like branches form a wide, graceful head which is handsome in winter and in spring is covered with masses of pure white flowers followed by ample bright foliage and abundant showy fruit.

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22 comments:

  1. thay are really nice. And useful as it seems. I wonder if the fruit is good as well?

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  2. I've seen plum trees but never in bloom. Reminds me cherry flowers.

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  3. Same here. Do regular plum trees have a different flower? In one of my previous houses I lived in, the neighbor had a plum tree, with a huge overhanging branch in our yard, but I can't remember seeing the flowers of it.

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  4. Hi Nick, I've been so enamored with the wild plums I saw in the highlands of Turkey. It is really full of white flowers that i can't seem to leave! very beautiful

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  5. They're nice. They look like crab apples at first glance. When spring comes, we'll see them here again. :-)

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  6. They are lovely! Thanks for hosting.

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  7. This is a lovely bloom! I love the delicacy of the petals and the coloring...

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  8. It's very beautiful! I'd love to have one in my yard. :)

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  9. Beautiful... Spring is in the air!! :)

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  10. Wonderful flowers, sooo gorgeous ..
    Love greetings, Karin

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  11. So beautiful! It would look so pretty in my yard.
    Happy Weekend!

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  12. come to my house in Dec and Jan, I will shout you a zillion plums.

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  13. What exquisite blossoms, Nick - a real treat to the eye.

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  14. Spring seems such a long way off for us, pretty capture.

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  15. I know exactly how these blossoms smell--heavenly!

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